Veronese

Founded in 1931, during what’s considered one of the seminal moments in international design, the house of Veronese was established by Mr. Marcel Barbier. In the spirit of the times - following the groundbreaking International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts - Barbier sought to combine modern design with the classical traditions of glass blowing. Barbier’s vision was to create exceptional Murano glass imbued with modern French aesthetics.
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Taking its title from Paolo Veronese, the 16th century Italian Renaissance painter whose depiction of a glass vase in his painting “The Annunciation” influenced the craft of early glass blowing, Veronese imbues traditional Murano artisanship with a uniquely French sensibility. Barbier’s vision has led to innovative collaborations with the likes of renowned architect Andre Arbus, a multi-hyphenate whose modern designs spanned sculpture, furniture, objects and buildings. The collaboration yielded many iconic projects, including the 1938 Cascade chandelier, obelisks created for the 1952 Bretagne luxury cruise and the famous ”Jets d’eau” chandelier.

Following those early collaborations, Veronese has gained a reputation for working with the world’s foremost designers, artisans and architects. In the 70s, considered a benchmark era for French design, Veronese forged partnerships with globally famous architects and trendsetters and began expanding internationally. Among the names to work with the company are Chantal Thomas, Olivier Ganere, Maurizio Galante and Tal Lancman. Each designer was chosen for their ability to bring innovation and exceptional craftsmanship to the iconic French brand.

Today, the company continues to push the boundaries of design and craftsmanship. New collaborations include those with The Future Perfect favorite Piet Hein Eek and Frenchman Patrick Jouin. Embraced by both the design community and the press, the brand has been featured in Architectural Digest, The New York Times and Corriere Della Sera Living.
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THE PRESENT TENSE